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Sunday, February 16
 

7:00am

Short Course Registration Opens
Check In, Registration and Continental Breakfast

Sunday February 16, 2020 7:00am - 8:00am
Foyer 4th Floor

7:45am

The Fundamentals of Coatings
Dr. James W. Rawlins

Course Purpose: 

To provide entry level chemists in the coatings industry an understanding of the principles involved in formulating coatings.
Course Description: 
This one day short course is designed to provide attendees an elementary introduction to coatings.  The course material will discuss fundamentals of the key ingredients used in coatings, i.e., polymers, pigments, additives and solvents.  It will serve as a useful primer for the material that will be covered in the next two days of your chosen short course.
Who should attend: 
The first day’s course material is ideal for fresh entrants into the coatings industry who are not fully conversant with the basic components of coatings.  The technical content of this course will supplement the material covered in our other short courses.    

Short Course Instructors
avatar for David White

David White

Vice President of Technical Services, Pan Technology
Introduction to PigmentsPigment characteristics, classification, opacity, particle size, oil absorption value, PVC, CPVC, RPVC, organic and inorganic pigments, metallic and pearlescent pigmentsBiographyDavid White is VP Technical Services at Pan Technology. David has over 40 years... Read More →
avatar for James Rawlins

James Rawlins

Professor of Polymer Science, The University of Southern Mississippi
Fundamentals of Coatings:Introduction to CoatingsAbstract ComingStructure-Property Relationships in PolymersThe Science of Formulating:Advanced Structure-Property Relationships in PolymersMolecular weight, critical entanglement molecular weight, crosslink density, crystallinity, hydroplasticization... Read More →
avatar for Keith Moody

Keith Moody

Senior Technical Service Associate, Coatings Technical Service Lab , Retired Eastman Chemical - Consultant
SolventsSolvent type, classification, characteristics, solvency, evaporation rate, odor, flash point, VOC, HAP, MIR, formulation considerationsBiogrpahyKeith received his BS in Chemistry from Kentucky Wesleyan College in 1976 and his MS in Polymer Chemistry from the University of... Read More →
avatar for Michael Blanton

Michael Blanton

Research Associate and Team Leader, The University of Southern Mississippi
The Fundamentals of Coatings:Abbreviations and Acronyms in the World of Polymers and CoatingsAbstract ComingPolymers Utilized in CoatingsAbstract ComingThe Science of Formulating: Coatings CharacterizationScanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, Confocal... Read More →



Sunday February 16, 2020 7:45am - 5:00pm

9:30am

Coffee Break
Sunday February 16, 2020 9:30am - 10:00am
 
Monday, February 17
 

7:00am

Short Course Registration Open
Check In, Registration and Continental Breakfast

Monday February 17, 2020 7:00am - 8:00am
Foyer 4th Floor

7:45am

Reformulating to Waterborne Coatings
Dr.  Robson F. Storey
Bennett Distinguished Professor of Polymer Science

Course Purpose: To provide chemists in the coatings industry an understanding of the principles involved in reformulating systems to a waterborne system.
Course Description: Reformulating to Waterborne Coatings is an intensive, two-day course providing an introduction to the technology of waterborne coatings with an emphasis on the challenges encountered in converting existing solvent-borne coating systems to water. It consists of a series of lectures organized around various popular coating types including acrylic latex, polyester/alkyd, two-component polyurethane, polyurethane dispersion, epoxy, and silicone. Additional topics include the use of additives, pigments and pigment dispersion, and application methods for waterborne coatings.
Who should attend: The course is designed for coating chemists and formulators and for persons interested in new applications for waterborne coatings.


Short Course Instructors
avatar for Brian Priore

Brian Priore

Research Associate, Axalta
Formulation of Waterborne Pigment DispersionsColor pigments are one of the most expensive ingredients for coatings and thus need to be fully utilized by grinding and then imparting colloidal stability against flocculation. Colloidal stabilization mechanism for waterborne pigment dispersions... Read More →
avatar for Don Liles

Don Liles

Retired - Emulsions Development Group, Dow Corning Corporation
The Role of Silicones in Formulating Water-Based CoatingsSilicones represent a class of compounds that are based on the element silicon and they exist in a variety of forms that include oils, fluids, high viscosity polymers, gums, elastomers, resins and silanes. Silicones are completely... Read More →
avatar for Jim Reader

Jim Reader

Senior Applied Research and Technology Manager - Americas, Evonik Corporation
Short CourseSurfactants, Defoamers and Dispersants in Waterborne Coatings   This lecture discussion the use of surfactants and defoamers in waterborne coatings. The objective is to provide an understanding of the factors that influence surfactant and defoamer selection and performance... Read More →
avatar for Leo Procopio

Leo Procopio

Group Leader, The Dow Chemical Company
Formulating Waterborne Acrylic Polymers for Industrial CoatingsThis lecture introduces acrylic polymer technology and its use in paints and coatings, with an emphasis on waterborne latex polymers. The composition and morphology of acrylic latex polymers is discussed, focusing on how... Read More →
avatar for Mike Jeffries

Mike Jeffries

Field Technical Service Manager - Coatings, Adhesives & Specialties, Covestro
High Performance Waterborne Two-Component PolyurethanesThis talk with discuss the chemistry of both components in a two-component PUD. It will review water dispersible polyisocyanate crosslinkers and isocyanate reactive waterborne polymers. In addition methods of formulating these... Read More →
avatar for Robson Storey

Robson Storey

Professor, School of Polymer Science and Engineering, The University of Southern Mississippi, University of Southern Missisisippi
Short CourseWelcome & Course OverviewFundamentals of Polymer Design for Waterborne CoatingsThis introductory lecture discusses the general features of polymers used in waterborne coatings, and how these polymers differ from polymers used in traditional solventborne coatings. Various... Read More →
avatar for Romesh Kumar

Romesh Kumar

Sr. Technical Sales Manager – North America, Clariant Plastics & Coatings USA Inc.
Short Course AbstractPigment Selection for Architectural CoatingsCompetition and environmental regulations require the architectural coatings manufacturers to develop innovative formulations to improve traditional colorant systems. This includes improved hiding, reduced VOC (almost... Read More →
avatar for Sam Morell

Sam Morell

President, samMorell.com
Short CourseRheology of Waterborne CoatingsThis presentation on rheology reviews the basic principles of rheology including its definition and its influencers - chemical structure, morphology, and environmental conditions. The impact by various deformation forces including compression... Read More →
avatar for Shiying Zheng

Shiying Zheng

Research Director, Evonik Corporation
Short CourseFormulating Two-Package, Ambient-Cure Waterborne Epoxy Coatings This short course introduces the concept and applications of waterborne epoxy systems. It describes the chemistry, design principles, and types of epoxy resin and amine curing agents of such systems. The short... Read More →
avatar for Todd Williams

Todd Williams

Product and Tech Service - Coatings, Adhesives, and Specialties Group, Covestro
The Science of Formulating Short CourseFormulating 1k and 2k Waterborne PolyurethanesMoisture cure polyurethane coatings, 2K polyurethane coatings, formulation variables that affect weathering, 2K polyaspartic coatings, 1K and 2K waterborne polyurethane coatingsThis talk will discuss... Read More →



Monday February 17, 2020 7:45am - 5:00pm

7:45am

The Science of Formulating
Dr. James W. Rawlins

Course Purpose: 

To provide entry level chemists in the coatings industry an understanding of the principles involved in formulating coatings. 
Course Description: 
Coatings manufacture is challenging in its complexity as the ingredient list could often contain more than ten items. Formulating a good coating requires a good understanding of the manufacturing technique as well as troubleshooting problems. This short course will seek to impart a comprehensive understanding of pigments, resins, solvents, additives, formulations principles, calculations, and manufacturing techniques applicable to the coatings industry.
Who should attend: 
This short course is a general course covering major paint types presented at a fundamental technical level, and is designed for entry-level chemists to the coatings industry.  

Short Course Instructors
avatar for Austin Maples

Austin Maples

Product Technology Scientist at Ascend Performance Materials, Ascend Performance Materials
AbstractFormulating High Performance Waterborne Epoxy CoatingsEstablishing requirements, formulation process, choice of epoxy resins and curing agents, solvent choice, pigments and fillers, additive selection, coating manufacture, testing and applicationBiographyMy Ph.D. research... Read More →
avatar for Chris Howard

Chris Howard

Manager – Product Sales, Lintech International
Additive Technology – Principles and FormulationDefoaming and deaeration, surface control, substrate wetting, adhesion, pigment wetting and stabilization, rheology control, moisture scavengers, catalysts and carboxylates, specialty additives, optimization of additives, coatings... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Calimente

Daniel Calimente

Technical Manager, Wacker Chemical Corporation
Silicone Chemistry and their Utility in Coatings ApplicationsSilicone resins, form of silicon usage in coatings, applications, formulation guidelines, examplesBiographyDr. Daniel Calimente is currently the Technical Manager for the Industrial Coatings at the Wacker Chemical Corporation... Read More →
avatar for David Fasano

David Fasano

Application Scientist , Retired Dow Chemical
Latex Polymers and Waterborne Architectural CoatingsLatex types, properties, applications, factors governing choice of latexes for different applications, formulation guidelines, additives used with latexesMethods to reduce dependence on TiO2 while maintaining or improving performance... Read More →
avatar for James Rawlins

James Rawlins

Professor of Polymer Science, The University of Southern Mississippi
Fundamentals of Coatings:Introduction to CoatingsAbstract ComingStructure-Property Relationships in PolymersThe Science of Formulating:Advanced Structure-Property Relationships in PolymersMolecular weight, critical entanglement molecular weight, crosslink density, crystallinity, hydroplasticization... Read More →
avatar for Keith Moody

Keith Moody

Senior Technical Service Associate, Coatings Technical Service Lab , Retired Eastman Chemical - Consultant
SolventsSolvent type, classification, characteristics, solvency, evaporation rate, odor, flash point, VOC, HAP, MIR, formulation considerationsBiogrpahyKeith received his BS in Chemistry from Kentucky Wesleyan College in 1976 and his MS in Polymer Chemistry from the University of... Read More →
avatar for Michael Blanton

Michael Blanton

Research Associate and Team Leader, The University of Southern Mississippi
The Fundamentals of Coatings:Abbreviations and Acronyms in the World of Polymers and CoatingsAbstract ComingPolymers Utilized in CoatingsAbstract ComingThe Science of Formulating: Coatings CharacterizationScanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, Confocal... Read More →
avatar for Robert Santine

Robert Santine

Regional Sales Manager, BYK Gardner USA
ColorCauses of color, hue, lightness, chroma, L*a*b* color space, color measurementBiographyRobert J. Santine Regional Sales Manager for BYK Gardner USA. Sales, training and support for color measurement and appearance measurement instruments, including multi-angle and conventional... Read More →
avatar for Todd Williams

Todd Williams

Product and Tech Service - Coatings, Adhesives, and Specialties Group, Covestro
The Science of Formulating Short CourseFormulating 1k and 2k Waterborne PolyurethanesMoisture cure polyurethane coatings, 2K polyurethane coatings, formulation variables that affect weathering, 2K polyaspartic coatings, 1K and 2K waterborne polyurethane coatingsThis talk will discuss... Read More →



Monday February 17, 2020 7:45am - 5:15pm
 
Tuesday, February 18
 

7:00am

Short Course Registration Open
Check In, Registration and Continental Breakfast

Tuesday February 18, 2020 7:00am - 8:00am
Foyer 4th Floor

7:45am

Reformulating to Waterborne Coatings
Dr.  Robson F. Storey
Bennett Distinguished Professor of Polymer Science

Course Purpose: To provide chemists in the coatings industry an understanding of the principles involved in reformulating systems to a waterborne system.
Course Description: Reformulating to Waterborne Coatings is an intensive, two-day course providing an introduction to the technology of waterborne coatings with an emphasis on the challenges encountered in converting existing solvent-borne coating systems to water. It consists of a series of lectures organized around various popular coating types including acrylic latex, polyester/alkyd, two-component polyurethane, polyurethane dispersion, epoxy, and silicone. Additional topics include the use of additives, pigments and pigment dispersion, and application methods for waterborne coatings.
Who should attend: The course is designed for coating chemists and formulators and for persons interested in new applications for waterborne coatings.


Short Course Instructors
avatar for Brian Priore

Brian Priore

Research Associate, Axalta
Formulation of Waterborne Pigment DispersionsColor pigments are one of the most expensive ingredients for coatings and thus need to be fully utilized by grinding and then imparting colloidal stability against flocculation. Colloidal stabilization mechanism for waterborne pigment dispersions... Read More →
avatar for Don Liles

Don Liles

Retired - Emulsions Development Group, Dow Corning Corporation
The Role of Silicones in Formulating Water-Based CoatingsSilicones represent a class of compounds that are based on the element silicon and they exist in a variety of forms that include oils, fluids, high viscosity polymers, gums, elastomers, resins and silanes. Silicones are completely... Read More →
avatar for Jim Reader

Jim Reader

Senior Applied Research and Technology Manager - Americas, Evonik Corporation
Short CourseSurfactants, Defoamers and Dispersants in Waterborne Coatings   This lecture discussion the use of surfactants and defoamers in waterborne coatings. The objective is to provide an understanding of the factors that influence surfactant and defoamer selection and performance... Read More →
avatar for Leo Procopio

Leo Procopio

Group Leader, The Dow Chemical Company
Formulating Waterborne Acrylic Polymers for Industrial CoatingsThis lecture introduces acrylic polymer technology and its use in paints and coatings, with an emphasis on waterborne latex polymers. The composition and morphology of acrylic latex polymers is discussed, focusing on how... Read More →
avatar for Mike Jeffries

Mike Jeffries

Field Technical Service Manager - Coatings, Adhesives & Specialties, Covestro
High Performance Waterborne Two-Component PolyurethanesThis talk with discuss the chemistry of both components in a two-component PUD. It will review water dispersible polyisocyanate crosslinkers and isocyanate reactive waterborne polymers. In addition methods of formulating these... Read More →
avatar for Robson Storey

Robson Storey

Professor, School of Polymer Science and Engineering, The University of Southern Mississippi, University of Southern Missisisippi
Short CourseWelcome & Course OverviewFundamentals of Polymer Design for Waterborne CoatingsThis introductory lecture discusses the general features of polymers used in waterborne coatings, and how these polymers differ from polymers used in traditional solventborne coatings. Various... Read More →
avatar for Romesh Kumar

Romesh Kumar

Sr. Technical Sales Manager – North America, Clariant Plastics & Coatings USA Inc.
Short Course AbstractPigment Selection for Architectural CoatingsCompetition and environmental regulations require the architectural coatings manufacturers to develop innovative formulations to improve traditional colorant systems. This includes improved hiding, reduced VOC (almost... Read More →
avatar for Sam Morell

Sam Morell

President, samMorell.com
Short CourseRheology of Waterborne CoatingsThis presentation on rheology reviews the basic principles of rheology including its definition and its influencers - chemical structure, morphology, and environmental conditions. The impact by various deformation forces including compression... Read More →
avatar for Shiying Zheng

Shiying Zheng

Research Director, Evonik Corporation
Short CourseFormulating Two-Package, Ambient-Cure Waterborne Epoxy Coatings This short course introduces the concept and applications of waterborne epoxy systems. It describes the chemistry, design principles, and types of epoxy resin and amine curing agents of such systems. The short... Read More →
avatar for Todd Williams

Todd Williams

Product and Tech Service - Coatings, Adhesives, and Specialties Group, Covestro
The Science of Formulating Short CourseFormulating 1k and 2k Waterborne PolyurethanesMoisture cure polyurethane coatings, 2K polyurethane coatings, formulation variables that affect weathering, 2K polyaspartic coatings, 1K and 2K waterborne polyurethane coatingsThis talk will discuss... Read More →



Tuesday February 18, 2020 7:45am - 5:00pm

7:45am

The Science of Formulating
Dr. James W. Rawlins

Course Purpose: 

To provide entry level chemists in the coatings industry an understanding of the principles involved in formulating coatings. 
Course Description: 
Coatings manufacture is challenging in its complexity as the ingredient list could often contain more than ten items. Formulating a good coating requires a good understanding of the manufacturing technique as well as troubleshooting problems. This short course will seek to impart a comprehensive understanding of pigments, resins, solvents, additives, formulations principles, calculations, and manufacturing techniques applicable to the coatings industry.
Who should attend: 
This short course is a general course covering major paint types presented at a fundamental technical level, and is designed for entry-level chemists to the coatings industry.  

Short Course Instructors
avatar for Austin Maples

Austin Maples

Product Technology Scientist at Ascend Performance Materials, Ascend Performance Materials
AbstractFormulating High Performance Waterborne Epoxy CoatingsEstablishing requirements, formulation process, choice of epoxy resins and curing agents, solvent choice, pigments and fillers, additive selection, coating manufacture, testing and applicationBiographyMy Ph.D. research... Read More →
avatar for Chris Howard

Chris Howard

Manager – Product Sales, Lintech International
Additive Technology – Principles and FormulationDefoaming and deaeration, surface control, substrate wetting, adhesion, pigment wetting and stabilization, rheology control, moisture scavengers, catalysts and carboxylates, specialty additives, optimization of additives, coatings... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Calimente

Daniel Calimente

Technical Manager, Wacker Chemical Corporation
Silicone Chemistry and their Utility in Coatings ApplicationsSilicone resins, form of silicon usage in coatings, applications, formulation guidelines, examplesBiographyDr. Daniel Calimente is currently the Technical Manager for the Industrial Coatings at the Wacker Chemical Corporation... Read More →
avatar for David Fasano

David Fasano

Application Scientist , Retired Dow Chemical
Latex Polymers and Waterborne Architectural CoatingsLatex types, properties, applications, factors governing choice of latexes for different applications, formulation guidelines, additives used with latexesMethods to reduce dependence on TiO2 while maintaining or improving performance... Read More →
avatar for James Rawlins

James Rawlins

Professor of Polymer Science, The University of Southern Mississippi
Fundamentals of Coatings:Introduction to CoatingsAbstract ComingStructure-Property Relationships in PolymersThe Science of Formulating:Advanced Structure-Property Relationships in PolymersMolecular weight, critical entanglement molecular weight, crosslink density, crystallinity, hydroplasticization... Read More →
avatar for Keith Moody

Keith Moody

Senior Technical Service Associate, Coatings Technical Service Lab , Retired Eastman Chemical - Consultant
SolventsSolvent type, classification, characteristics, solvency, evaporation rate, odor, flash point, VOC, HAP, MIR, formulation considerationsBiogrpahyKeith received his BS in Chemistry from Kentucky Wesleyan College in 1976 and his MS in Polymer Chemistry from the University of... Read More →
avatar for Michael Blanton

Michael Blanton

Research Associate and Team Leader, The University of Southern Mississippi
The Fundamentals of Coatings:Abbreviations and Acronyms in the World of Polymers and CoatingsAbstract ComingPolymers Utilized in CoatingsAbstract ComingThe Science of Formulating: Coatings CharacterizationScanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, Confocal... Read More →
avatar for Robert Santine

Robert Santine

Regional Sales Manager, BYK Gardner USA
ColorCauses of color, hue, lightness, chroma, L*a*b* color space, color measurementBiographyRobert J. Santine Regional Sales Manager for BYK Gardner USA. Sales, training and support for color measurement and appearance measurement instruments, including multi-angle and conventional... Read More →
avatar for Todd Williams

Todd Williams

Product and Tech Service - Coatings, Adhesives, and Specialties Group, Covestro
The Science of Formulating Short CourseFormulating 1k and 2k Waterborne PolyurethanesMoisture cure polyurethane coatings, 2K polyurethane coatings, formulation variables that affect weathering, 2K polyaspartic coatings, 1K and 2K waterborne polyurethane coatingsThis talk will discuss... Read More →



Tuesday February 18, 2020 7:45am - 5:15pm

12:00pm

12:00pm

4:00pm

5:30pm

Tuesday Evening Opening Wine and Cheese Reception
Please join us for our Opening wine and Cheese Reception, located in the exhibit hall, this reception is an excellent opportunity to network with our exhibitors, speakers and other attendees.

Tuesday February 18, 2020 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Waterbury Ballroom - 2nd Floor
 
Wednesday, February 19
 

7:45am

Opening Remarks and Announcments
Short Course Instructors
avatar for James Rawlins

James Rawlins

Professor of Polymer Science, The University of Southern Mississippi
Fundamentals of Coatings:Introduction to CoatingsAbstract ComingStructure-Property Relationships in PolymersThe Science of Formulating:Advanced Structure-Property Relationships in PolymersMolecular weight, critical entanglement molecular weight, crosslink density, crystallinity, hydroplasticization... Read More →


Wednesday February 19, 2020 7:45am - 8:00am
Rhythms Rooms I - III

8:00am

Plenary Speaker - Towards Sustainability in Coatings Technology: Progress, Opportunities, Barriers - North Dakota State University
Abstract

A global grand challenge today is to transition towards a sustainable economy. While there are many possible aspects to sustainability, some of the ones that can affect the coatings industry are the use of bio-based materials, pollution reduction, energy reduction, increasing coating functionality and durability, and recycling of unused paint. Due to environmental regulations over the past decades, the coatings industry has been addressing these issues by reducing VOC content in coatings, and switching to waterborne and powder coatings. In addition, the industry has had a legacy of using renewable materials such as seed oils, cellulosics, and bio-based solvents. Reductions in energy usage can be realized using radiation curing technology as well as elimination of intermediate baking steps in automotive production. Further research is being done to expand the use of biobased materials, increase coating durability and longevity, create “smart” and functional coatings and replace chemicals of concern. A question remains: How far can be go in creating a fully sustainable coatings industry?

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Dean Webster

Dr. Dean Webster

Professor and Chair - Coatings and Polymeric Materials Department, North Dakota State University
Dr. Dean Webster joined the Coatings and Polymeric Materials Department at NDSU in the fall of 2001.  Prior to coming to NDSU, Dr. Webster worked in industry for over 17 years.  Beginning in 1984 he worked for the Sherwin-Williams Company where he was involved in resin developm... Read More →



Wednesday February 19, 2020 8:00am - 9:00am
Rhythms Rooms I - III

9:00am

King Cake Coffee Break
Join us in our exhibit hall for coffee, king cake and networking

Wednesday February 19, 2020 9:00am - 10:00am
Waterbury Ballroom - 2nd Floor

9:00am

10:00am

Expert Panel Discussion - "Efficient and Sustainable Coatings"
2020 Coatings World Expert Panel Session
More information coming soon!

Panelists:
Anthony Woods, Segment Director, AkzoNobel Industrial Coatings 
David Darling,VP, Health, Safety and Environmental Affairs, American Coatings Association
Mark Nonweller, President, Crescent Bronze Powder Co., Inc

 


 


Wednesday February 19, 2020 10:00am - 11:30am
Rhythms Rooms I - III

11:30am

Lunch Break
Wednesday February 19, 2020 11:30am - 1:00pm

1:00pm

Novel Multifunctional Coalescent for Property Improvement and Lower VOC L - Emerald Kalama Chemical
Emerald Kalama Chemical has developed a new coalescent to address challenges in the industry for improving key properties of coatings while minimizing volatile organic compound (VOC) values of waterborne latex coating formulations.  Environmental regulatory groups continue to lower VOC limits in coatings, and traditional low vapor pressure coalescents can lower VOC while improving gloss values and scrub resistance.  However, block resistance, hardness development, and dirt pickup resistance can be challenging to achieve with these materials in low PVC formulations.  Emerald’s new coalescent increases coalescent efficiency, hardness development, dirt pickup resistance, and blocking resistance even when compared to commonly used high VOC coalescent aids.  With respect to specific binders, improvement in wet edge, open time and scrub resistance values have been observed.  Emerald is continuing to develop new technologies which also contribute to improved properties in deep base formulations as well as flash rust prevention.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Foster

Stephen Foster

Applications Chemist, Emerald Kalama Chemical
BiographyDr. Stephen Foster has been an applications scientist with Emerald Performance Materials since the beginning of 2015. Stephen studied polymer science at the University of Southern Mississippi and attained his doctorate in Polymer Science and Engineering. His work at Emerald... Read More →



Wednesday February 19, 2020 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Rhythms Room I

1:00pm

The Sidney Lauren Memorial Lecture - Non-Isocyanate Polyurethane Coatings cured via Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition

Conventional polyurethane/polyurea polymers are crosslinked by reaction of a polyisocyanate compound with a polyol of the polyester, polyether, or polyacrylic type. Polyurethanes offer superior mechanical properties, especially abrasion resistance, good chemical resistance, and excellent weatherability (aliphatic isocyanates only). Polyurethanes are used in many high-performance polymer applications, including coatings, adhesives, flexible and rigid foams, and solid elastomers. Recently, there has been interest in polyurethane/polyurea polymers that can be crosslinked by alternative chemistries. Our research group has developed a series of these polymers for coatings that cure by azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Commercial polyisocyanate resins based on trimers of hexane diisocyanate, including allophanate (e.g. Desmodur® XP2580), isocyanurate (e.g. Desmodur N3300), and biuret (e.g. Desmodur N3200) were reacted with propargyl alcohol to produce polyurethane resins with propargyl functionality. Various polyols, including polyether (PPG 1000), polyester (Desmophen® 650), and polyacrylic (Setalux® DA 870) types were modified to convert their hydroxyl functionality to azide functionality. The best performance was obtained with an alkyne component based on Desmodur XP2580 and an azidated polyol based on Setalux DA 870. Clear, high-solids, two-component coatings were formulated with and without Cu(I) catalyst, employing about 5 - 10 wt% n-butyl acetate for final viscosity reduction.  The coatings were drawn down on steel panels (6 mils wet), the solvent was allowed to flash, and the films were cured for 4 hours at 100 °C.  The coating performance properties including pencil hardness, MEK double rubs, and glass transition temperature (Tg) were comparable to a conventional polyurethane control coating made from the precursor resins. Azide-alkyne formulations in the presence of copper catalyst with reducing agent exhibited faster curing kinetics than the polyurethane control.

Speakers
avatar for Robson Storey

Robson Storey

Professor, School of Polymer Science and Engineering, The University of Southern Mississippi, University of Southern Missisisippi
Short CourseWelcome & Course OverviewFundamentals of Polymer Design for Waterborne CoatingsThis introductory lecture discusses the general features of polymers used in waterborne coatings, and how these polymers differ from polymers used in traditional solventborne coatings. Various... Read More →



Wednesday February 19, 2020 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Rhythms Rooms I - III

1:00pm

1:30pm

Rheological Investigations on the Drying of Polymer Dispersions and Paint Films - Clariant
A special measuring geometry, rotating at low constant angular velocity through a paint film, was developed to record the increase of torque during drying under constant temperature and humidity conditions, thus giving access to a qualitative and quantitative differentiation of additives regarding their impact on the drying behavior of the paint.  A series of additives with different hydrophilic lipophilic balance values was tested in two paints, an acrylic lacquer with a pigment volume concentration of 36.2% and an indoor/outdoor dispersion paint with a pigment volume concentration of 78.6%.  Interestingly, the additive performance was found to be dependent on the paint composition, suggesting that specific interactions between the additives and the paint ingredients are mainly responsible for influencing the drying process.  This method represents an interesting alternative for additive testing and identification of the best choice to achieve the desired impact on the drying behavior of waterborne dispersion paints.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Coward

Mark Coward

Technical Leader Paints & Coatings, Clariant
Biography - Mark CowardMark Coward is Technical Leader for Paints & Coatings at Clariant in the Industrial & Consumer Specialties Business Unit. He started with Clariant in 2018. He has been in the paint industry for over 25 years, holding positions in various R&D roles of increasing... Read More →



Wednesday February 19, 2020 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Rhythms Room I

1:30pm

Understanding Chemical Resistance in Epoxy Systems - Evonik
Two-component epoxy systems have proven track record for providing excellent mechanical properties, chemical resistance, and adhesion to a wide range of substrates. They are frequently chosen over other technologies especially when chemical resistance is an important attribute. Chemical resistance is required in a variety of applications from construction and infrastructure to marine and protective metal coatings, and involves various substrate surfaces in flooring, bridges, wastewater treatment plants, power plants, metal equipment, and marine ships. These assets are constantly under attacks from various chemicals such as salt water, acids, and organic solvents. Chemical resistance is critical to provide protection to maximize the service life of the assets.

A number of factors determine the type of epoxy system required for chemical resistance. Key aspects influencing the chemical resistance of an epoxy system include crosslinking density, and degree of cure. Crosslinking density largely depends on the structure and functionality of epoxy resin and curing agent, while system mobility impacts the degree of cure. Molecular modelling and analytical techniques of differential scanning calorimetry, Raman spectroscopy, and dynamic mechanical analysis shed light on the fundamental understanding of the influence of crosslinking density and degree of cure on chemical resistance. This paper will detail the results of such fundamental study.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Shiying Zheng

Dr. Shiying Zheng

Research Director, Evonik Corporation
Dr. Shiying Zheng is a research scientist at Crosslinkers business line of Evonik Corporation in Allentown, PA. Her current primary focus is developing new epoxy curing agents and aqueous epoxy resin dispersions for coating applications. Dr. Zheng brings extensive industrial R&D experience... Read More →



Wednesday February 19, 2020 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Rhythms II-III

2:00pm

Fine-tuning Coating Surface Control Through the Use of Modified Siloxanes - Evonik
Siloxane-based additives are critical tools in coating applications because their structures can be varied to provide a broad range of performance benefits in many types of formulations and chemistries.  Surfactants and defoamers are some of the more commonly recognized additive classes, but many other functionalities can be derived from siloxane chemistries; particularly attributes related to surface control such as flow and leveling, slip, scratch resistance, and haptic properties. This extensive range of performance is achievable due to the broad flexibility inherent in siloxane chemistry, allowing a fine-tuned balance of compatibility, incompatibility, and surface activity.
As with many additive types, a broad range of functionalities creates many options for improvement and innovation but also presents challenges in finding the right additive and optimizing to achieve the desired performance. This paper will attempt to clarify the general structure-property relationships that drive the performance attributes of siloxane additives and detail the continuum that exists between wetting, leveling, defoaming and slip within this chemistry class. Surface control properties and testing will be reviewed and related to recent evaluation work conducted in developing novel siloxane surface control additives.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Ingrid K. Meier

Dr. Ingrid K. Meier

Head of Applied Research & Technology, Decorative Coatings and Inks Americas, Evonik Corporation
Ingrid Meier received her B.S. in Chemistry from Ursinus College and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Chemistry from Princeton University.  She has more than 30 years’ industrial experience as both a senior scientist as well as in regional and global technical managerial positions... Read More →



Wednesday February 19, 2020 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Rhythms Room I

2:00pm

Oil is Oil…Until It’s Not: An Investigation into the Coating Structure-Property Relationships of Various Process Oils - Firestone Building Products Company, LLC
In an effort to correlate oil industry characterization parameters with properties commonly used in the polymer/coatings industry, sixteen process oils were screened for use in a two-component aromatic polyurethane coating formulation.  A combination of viscosity and proton NMR testing was employed to successfully predict aniline point (oil industry) and cloud point (ink varnish industry) for the various oils.  Aniline/cloud point values were used to interpret oil migration behavior as well as tensile and adhesion properties of the coating films.  Cured film properties of the coatings will be presented.  These results provide a useful framework for the formulator to incorporate process oils in coating formulations.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Molaison

Chris Molaison

Senior Material Scientist, Firestone Building Products Company, LLC
BiographyChris Molaison is currently Senior Material Scientist for Firestone Building Products Company, LLC focusing in several areas consisting of product development, product/process improvement, method development, and raw material second sourcing. Prior to FSBP, he began his industrial... Read More →



Wednesday February 19, 2020 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Rhythms II-III

2:30pm

Coffee Break
Join us in our Exhibit Hall for Coffee and Networking

Wednesday February 19, 2020 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Waterbury Ballroom - 2nd Floor

3:30pm

Solvent Trapping Effect on Pull-off Adhesion of Model Epoxy-amine Coatings to Steel - USM
Solvents continue to be a large part of the surface coating industry, making it important to know how the chosen solvents and their quantities affect the final product and performance.  One of the defects seen in solventbased systems is solvent trapping.  Rapid solvent loss from a freshly applied coating could result in the surface layer forming a skin, which significantly decreases the solvent diffusion coefficient at the air interface and traps the solvent remaining in the film.  The residual solvent has significant influence on the film's properties. Primarily, residual solvent induces film plasticization, which is manifest as reduction in modulus and glass transition temperature.  Due to skin formation, these changes are noted more towards the substrate interface.  
The effects of residual solvent on interfacial properties such as adhesion are virtually unexplored.  In the absence of residual solvent, increasing film thickness leads to increased internal stress and predictably lower adhesion.  As a consequence, there is a critical thickness for any formulation above which the coating is unable to be applied because it will spontaneously delaminate.
This solvent trapping process can be modeled to predict the amount of residual solvent over a range of time and temperatures.  The present work demonstrates a reversal of the relationship in the presence of residual solvent leading to better adhesion with increased thickness and elimination of the spontaneous delamination thickness.  Numerous factors contribute to this outcome and it is the goal of this work to investigate internal stress, modulus and interfacial interactions to explain what factors contribute in what way to the solvent trapping effect on adhesion.
The coatings in this study are model epoxy-amine networks formulated to cover a range of crosslink densities and glass transition temperatures.  Material properties, cure temperature, solvent boiling point and solvent-resin affinity encompass the processing knobs available to control the residual solvent content and its distribution.  Solvents that were used include ethanol, isopropanol, butanol, di(propylene glycol) propyl ether, xylene, tetrahydrofuran and p-chlorobenzotrifluoride. At each film thickness, the films were evaluated for residual solvent content, adhesion, modulus, internal stress and glass transition temperature. Residual solvent was determined by thermal gravimetric analysis. Adhesion was quantified using the pull-off method on a MTS load frame, while tensile testing was performed on the same load frame to collect modulus data. Internal stress of formation was calculated based on substrate deflection. The glass transition temperature was quantified from the tan d peak measured via dynamic mechanical analysis. These studies will help with the prediction and planning of interfacial adhesion properties of coatings and better formulation skills.

Speakers
avatar for Diana Gottschalk

Diana Gottschalk

Graduate Student, University of Southern Mississippi
Diana is a graduate student in the Thames-Rawlins Research Group at The University of Southern Mississippi, where she is scheduled to graduate in 2020. Her research focus is on understanding the interrelatedness of the coating bulk and the coating-substrate interface through adhesion... Read More →



Wednesday February 19, 2020 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Rhythms II-III

3:30pm

The Use of Engineered Silica to Enhance Coatings - Evonik
The field of coatings technology has utilized many forms of silica-based particles in the last 70 years. This large, varied class of fillers is generically broken into two categories of crystalline and amorphous morphology.  With ongoing scrutiny and sensitivity in the coatings industry to move towards less hazards in the workplace, greater emphasis is placed on suitable amorphous technology to replace crystalline silica technology.  Amorphous silica character is highly adaptable and flexible to be modified in both powder and pre-dispersed forms, and numerous engineered types of technologies have been developed to provide functional solutions to many coatings problems.
Amorphous silica technology has been developed to address functionalities including rheological control, suspension of pigments and fillers, reinforcement of coatings film, impart scratch resistance, impart hydrophobicity /anti-corrosion benefits, impart oleophobicity, as carriers of trace actives into coatings for homogenous distribution, flow control and charge enhancement of powdered coatings, and gloss reduction of liquid systems.  Particle technology and modification will be addressed and performance attributes highlighted for each of the types of tailor-made modifications.  A short discussion of the importance of proper dispersion and homogenous distribution within a
coatings matrix will be included.
This paper will address how amorphous silica technology is differentiated and engineered to create specially tailored solutions to enhance the performance of coatings and also highlight the latest technical developments in this field.

Short Course Instructors
avatar for Jim Reader

Jim Reader

Senior Applied Research and Technology Manager - Americas, Evonik Corporation
Short CourseSurfactants, Defoamers and Dispersants in Waterborne Coatings   This lecture discussion the use of surfactants and defoamers in waterborne coatings. The objective is to provide an understanding of the factors that influence surfactant and defoamer selection and performance... Read More →



Wednesday February 19, 2020 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Rhythms Room I

4:00pm

Alternative Polyurethanes Cured via Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition Using Reduced-Viscosity Poly(alkynyl carbamate) Prepolymers - USM
Abstract:
Conventional polyurethane coatings are crosslinked by reaction of a polyisocyanate prepolymer with a polyol. Recently there has been interest in the design of polyurethane polymers that can be crosslinked by alternative chemistries. The Storey Research Group at The University of Southern Mississippi has developed a series of these polymers for coatings, for which the final curing step involves azide-alkyne cycloaddition “click” chemistry. However, the conversion of a polyisocyanate prepolymer into a poly(alkynyl carbamate) results in dramatic viscosity increases due to hydrogen bonding of the carbamate structure, which is undesirable for coating application. To overcome this problem, a series of poly(alkynyl carbamate) prepolymers with lower viscosities was designed by chemically incorporating various glycol ether plasticizing moieties into the prepolymer chains. The glycol ether moieties were either of the conventional type, e.g. 2-ethoxyethanol, resulting in a non-load-bearing end group and a sacrifice of functionality, or they were specialty compounds containing both a hydroxyl group and an alkyne group, e.g. triethylene glycol monopropargyl ether, resulting in a load-bearing moiety and no sacrifice of functionality. This synthetic strategy, whether sacrificing the average functionality of the poly(alkynyl carbamate) or not, has proven to be effective in reducing the viscosity of the poly(alkynyl carbamate) prepolymer without compromising the final polyurethane coating performance.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Wu

Tom Wu

Graduate Student, USM
In 2010, Tom attended Beijing University of Chemical Technology, majored in Polymer Science and Engineering.  He graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in 2014 and enrolled in USM, School of Polymer Science and Engineering in pursuing of a doctorate degree.  He joined Storey... Read More →



Wednesday February 19, 2020 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Rhythms II-III

4:00pm

Bio-based Pigments and Super Transparent Colorants for Durable Finishes - Clariant
Earlier, both azo and polycyclic organic pigments were based on carbon (non-renewable sources) driven raw materials. Now with technological improvements, many of the high performance polycyclic pigments such as quinacridone are synthesized from bio-based raw materials.  These pigments have the same clean shades, high transparency, and high performance necessary for brilliant automotive finishes, but with much lower carbon footprint.
Several super transparent colorants have been developed based on chlorine-free pigments.  With optimum milling and additives, these colorants have excellent shelf stability, and compatibility in most solvent-based systems for high performance coatings.  For metallic shades in electronics and motorcycle finishes, these colorants offer no issues with waste incineration.  Small to large batches can be easily formulated with these stable and very chromatic colorants.
UV curable transparent colorants suitable for automotive simulated interior wood finishes will also be discussed.  These highly stable and durable colorants have very good shelf stability, and their compatibility with most reactive systems is also excellent, thus offering almost universal appeal.  In addition, these colorants are registered in most countries.
The bio-based pigments and super transparent colorants will be part of this paper dedicated for the industrial, automotive and other unique finishes.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Romesh Kumar

Dr. Romesh Kumar

Sr. Technical Sales Manager - North America, Clariant Plastics & Coatings USA, LLC
Romesh Kumar is Sr. Technical Sales Manager for North America, with Clariant Plastics & Coatings USA, LLC. His expertise include colorants & applications, color measurement and other related subjects.Schooled at Laurentian University (Sudbury, Ontario), and Rensselaer Polytechnic... Read More →



Wednesday February 19, 2020 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Rhythms Room I

4:30pm

An Easy, Tried-and-True Method to Ensure Quality in Coatings - Active Minerals International, LLC
Abstract
Coatings are complex composites designed to have a stable shelf-life, apply easily to a substrate, and provide lasting durability in varied environments. These performance criteria require disparate materials to be finely dispersed and work cohesively, which presents a major challenge as composites can be unstable and ultimately fail at points of inconsistency. To address this, the first thing a new paint chemist learns is that wetting agents are mandatory in allowing mineral fillers to disperse properly. Without them, these inorganic particles generally reject their organic media, agglomerate and settle out. It would be imprudent to forgo wetting agents.
Another well-known, tried-and-true technique to stabilize composites and improve their uniformity is to use high-quality, gel-grade attapulgite mineral products. They have been common in paint applications for several decades as thixotropic thickeners for low-shear flow and leveling, sag and spatter resistance and other rheology benefits. However, a seemingly forgotten higher value is their function as excellent stabilizers due to their unique colloidal lathe-shaped particles forming a stable lattice structure. This keeps liquids and particles more evenly dispersed and suspended, generating important benefits well beyond rheological properties; such as syneresis control, improved tint strength, hiding and freeze-thaw, and reduced color float and flooding.
This article gives a brief history of attapulgite, a description of its mechanism that sets it apart from other thixotropic thickeners and stabilizers, and discusses its performance benefits in coatings.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey B. Carr

Jeffrey B. Carr

Director, Commercial Development & Marketing, Active Minerals International, LLC
About:



Wednesday February 19, 2020 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Rhythms Room III

4:30pm

Color My World! New Tools for Improving Colorant Acceptance in Waterborne Architectural Coatings - Evonik
Claude Monet once commented that “Color is my day-long obsession, joy and
torment”, a sentiment that resonates with formulators of waterborne architectural paints who need to design base paints that can accept a variety of liquid colorants, enabling a paint line with the broadest possible color palette.
With the advent of point-of-sale (POS) tinting systems, many paint manufacturers now produce only a small number of base paints to which the colorants are added at the store.
Smaller quantities allow paint manufacturers and stores to manage inventories by stocking fewer materials, and it significantly decreases the amount of unused paint that goes to waste each year.
However, the colorants used in POS tinting systems must have excellent compatibility with different base paints to ensure consistent, reproducible colors under all conditions.  This remains one of the toughest challenges facing the waterborne architectural paint formulator today.
Difficulties occur when the additives used to stabilize the pigments in the colorant interact with additives in the base paint, causing loss of pigment stabilization and flocculation leading to an immediate or gradual color change that can be observed in a rub-out test in the laboratory. Problem pigments such as PV23, PBk7 and PB15:3 give rise to the most challenges with regards to colorant acceptance. This paper will describe the mechanisms involved in colorant stabilization and, using chemical structure-property relationships, explain how specific surface active agents are used within the base paint formulation to prevent destabilization of the colorant, ensuring that it performs as intended.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Ingrid K. Meier

Dr. Ingrid K. Meier

Head of Applied Research & Technology, Decorative Coatings and Inks Americas, Evonik Corporation
Ingrid Meier received her B.S. in Chemistry from Ursinus College and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Chemistry from Princeton University.  She has more than 30 years’ industrial experience as both a senior scientist as well as in regional and global technical managerial positions... Read More →



Wednesday February 19, 2020 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Rhythms Room I

5:30pm

Wednesday Evening Cajun Crawfish Reception
Please join us for our 2020 Wednesday Evening Reception, the theme this year is Cajun Crawfish Jamboree!
Get ready for some festive Zydeco music, creepy swamp critters, and delicious cajun eats.You'll feel like you're right at home in the old Bayou.


Wednesday February 19, 2020 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Armstrong Ballroom - 8th Floor
 
Thursday, February 20
 

8:00am

Advances in Focused Ion Beam Technology for the Characterization and Analysis of Polymer, Ceramic, and Metallic Coatings - Thermo Fisher
Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) techniques, together commonly known as a DualBeam, have long been a critical component for the analysis of polymer, ceramic, and metallic coatings.  Recent advances in ion beam technology have opened the practical application space to the processing and data collection from larger areas and greater volumes.  Due to throughput limitations, the common site-specific cross-sections were no larger than 50 - 100 µm; volumes for three-dimensional (3D) analysis measured in the tens of cubic microns.  The development and incorporation of the plasma focused ion beam (PFIB) has increased this by an order of magnitude, making up to 1 mm site-specific cross-sections a common feature.  Analytical volumes, including 3D imaging, 3D energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and 3D electron backscatter diffraction, have also expanded significantly.  These greater areas and volumes have improved the analysis of large features and increased the statistical relevancy of DualBeam data, aiding decision-making based on information derived at the micro- and nanometer scales.  This paper will discuss the advances in PFIB technology and provide application examples of polymer, ceramic, and metallic coatings.

Speakers
avatar for Rick Passey

Rick Passey

SEM/DualBeam Product Marketing Engineer, Materials and Structural Analysis, Thermo Fisher Scientific
BiographyRick Passey is an SEM/DualBeam applications expert who has been with Thermo Fisher Scientific (formerly FEI) for 11 years. His experience covers a wide range of microscopes and techniques, from environmental SEM to the multi-ion source plasma FIB, 3D EDS/EBSD characterization... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 8:00am - 8:30am
Rhythms Room I

8:00am

Balancing Performance in Interior Waterborne Coatings - Arkema
Waterborne coatings dominate the North American architectural coatings segment, largely due to the environmental friendliness and ease of use of those products. The residential repaint and remodel market, which includes consumer Do-It-Yourself (DIY) and contractor paints, accounts for over 60% of that segment. For those applications, there is a high value placed on balanced performance. These challenging performance targets are reflected in the many product label claims that paint manufacturers highlight on consumer products.  Through a simple survey of those claims from 14 top tier paint lines, one can see that stain resistance, durability, and
one-coat hide are three of the most highly valued performance benefits.
The first portion of this paper will summarize some benchmark testing on eight top tier product lines from the consumer segments, wherein we evaluated stain resistance, which is evaluated by testing washability to household stains, and durability, evaluated by testing ASTM scrub resistance.  That testing revealed some performance gaps in these products, which will be highlighted.
The research toward developing an emulsion polymer that provides a coating with a balance of washability, scrub resistance, and tint strength (related to one-coat hide) is summarized in the second portion of this paper.  Methods are identified for improving washability and scrub resistance through the proper selection of bulk monomer and functional monomer type and level. Additionally, the balancing of functional monomer and process conditions has led to a very powerful lever for improving titanium dioxide (TiO2) efficiency. Another component of emulsion polymers, the emulsifying/stabilizing surfactant, also contributes to stain resistance performance. Lastly, emphasis is placed on the role of various components of a waterborne paint formulation on the coating’s washability. These resin concepts were used to design an emulsion polymer for use in both flat and semigloss paints, the full performance balance of which will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Jeremy L. Grove

Jeremy L. Grove

Research Scientist, Arkema Coating Resins
BiographyJeremy L. Grove, Ph.D., earned his Bachelor’s Degree in Chemistry from Augusta State University in 2002. He accepted a position as an analytical chemist at Merck and Co. supporting R&D teams. In 2004, he joined the research group of George Majetich at the University of... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 8:00am - 9:00am
Rhythms II-III

8:30am

Microscopy Characterization of Coatings - Zeiss
Coatings have a broad range of applications in industries like pharmaceuticals, automotive, medical devices, textiles, oil and gas, aerospace and defense, food and packaging, and consumer optics, thanks to their role as functional, high performance or protective materials.  To meet stricter environmental regulations, increase sustainability and meet new customer demands, improving the
design of coatings and optimizing their performance is of critical importance to further advance innovation while remaining competitive in price. In addition, it is also important not only to develop novel materials, but also to maintain and ensure the quality of coatings while reducing the commercialization cycle.
Researchers rely on characterization techniques that help them understand the relationships between structure, properties, performance and process of coatings. Characterization includes 2D analytical solutions, 3D non‐destructive imaging and in situ capabilities, as well as advanced software packages that equip researchers to become pioneers in this field and expand the portfolio of coatings to new markets.
Characterization (microscopy, modelling and simulation, image analysis and spectroscopy) is used to determine the chemical composition as well as mapping contaminants and defects that influence the performance of coatings. In addition, these tools help researchers understand the structure and morphology, adhesion failure, as well as how the process variables influence the material properties. From looking at cross sections, delamination, corrosion to extracting actionable information from micrographs (thickness measurement and particle size distribution) and obtaining texture and roughness information, microscopy solutions provide new insights. In addition, uniformity and coverage of coatings, the presence of pores, microstructure and texture, segmentation and analysis of different features of interest as well as topography investigations can be determined.
This paper illustrates a case study on how optical and confocal microscopy, focused ion beam and correlative microscopy is used by ZEISS Vision R&D to make sure that new customer demands are met while keeping the quality and great performance of coatings.

Speakers
avatar for Fang Zhou

Fang Zhou

ZEISS Research Microscopy Solutions
BiographyFang Zhou is a solution Manager, Business Sector Materials Science, Carl Zeiss Microscopy. He received his PhD in Applied Physics from University of Tübingen. Previously, he received a B.S. from Zhejiang University in Hangzhou and a M.S. from Chinese Academy of Sciences... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 8:30am - 9:00am
Rhythms Room I

8:30am

Photosensitive HAPTIC Coatings for Athletic Footwear & More - HAPTIC
Waterborne high-solid 3D HAPTIC coatings are enjoying a big market success in recent years.  Its main application field is athletic footwear.  Exciting multi-color effects on multiple 3D coating levels in combination of sensational touch effects and high performance features allow totally new freedom of functional design.
Now new photosensitive HAPTIC coatings are being introduced to the markets.  HAPTIC coatings are based on fully waterborne PUD resins with high elasticity, flexibility and superior bonding properties and are usually applied on textile substrates.  Based on nanoscale oxidized graphene particles, i.e., graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles, highly photosensitive coating layers were developed.  The GO-doped HAPTIC layers show high transparency and are nearly colorless.  When the GO-doped coatings are exposed to natural sunlight or artificial UV light, the GO nano-layers start a chemical reduction process and dark black graphene nano-layers are produced.  Relatively large sp2 islands will be formed totally changing the absorption properties of the coatings and turning over time into dark black color.  By masking devices, the coating on athletic footwear could be partially exposed to UV light and design patterns could be created by selective UV exposure.  Furthermore, the GO-doped HAPTIC coatings could be further pigmented with standard pigments well known in coating industry or with iridescent special effect pigments.  During the time of UV exposure, creative color effect changes could be achieved changing the appearance of a surface over time.
Following the new mega trend of mass individualization of consumer products, these photosensitive coatings could open up opportunities for point-of-purchase individualization of athletic footwear and other products by using digital cut masking papers and UV radiation devices directly in the shop environment. Another option could be creating consumer products that will change color over time when used in outdoor sunshine environment.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Thomas Schmidt

Dr. Thomas Schmidt

Innovation & Creation, HUAFENG
BiographyBorn 1967 in Wuerzburg, Germany1987 Highschool Degree1988 Military Service1994 Master of Chemistry at University of Wuerzburg1998 PhD degree in Material Science in cooperation with Fraunhofer Institute, Siemens and University of Wuerzburg1999 Postdoc at University of Durham... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 8:30am - 9:00am
Rhythms II-III

9:00am

Introduction to Polymer Characterization Techniques - USM Faculty Tutorial
Abstract:
This tutorial will discuss common characterization techniques used in polymer science. It will give an overview of spectroscopy and scattering techniques, and introduce their usage in polymer science.

Speakers
avatar for Tutorial 1 - Xiaodan Gu

Tutorial 1 - Xiaodan Gu

University of Southern Mississippi
BiographyXiaodan Gu earned his Ph.D. from department of Polymer Science and Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, advised by Prof. Thomas P. Russell, focusing on the self-assembly of block copolymers and their lithographic applications. Subsequently, he started a... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 9:00am - 9:30am
Rhythms Room I

9:00am

Design of High performance 1K Direct-to-Metal Polyamide-polyurethane Coatings - Lubrizol
Novel polyamide-polyurethane polymers have recently been introduced to the market for use as protective metal topcoats, to offer high hardness, chemical resistance and durability.  This work expands on that concept to create direct-to-metal capable polyamide-polyurethane coatings by addressing the challenges of film formation, adhesion, and polymer/pigment interactions. Performance capabilities were evaluated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy/physical testing and benchmarked against an array of high-performance chemistries.

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Halstead, Ph.D.

Joshua Halstead, Ph.D.

Technical Manager – Applications Performance Coatings, Lubrizol Advanced Materials
BiographyJoshua has a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Cleveland State University and currently works for Lubrizol Advanced Materials as a technical manager for protective coatings applications. His work is focused around creating innovative next generation polymers/formulations for... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 9:00am - 9:30am
Rhythms II-III

9:00am

9:30am

Morning Coffee Break
Thursday February 20, 2020 9:30am - 10:30am
Waterbury Ballroom - 2nd Floor

10:30am

48 Years in the Coating Lab - A Fun Look Back - Chemquest
After working in coating labs for over 45 years, I have seen a lot of changes. This presentation will highlight some of the changes (government regulations, raw materials, etc) and the reasons for them. In some cases, the changes caused more problems than they helped. One example is OSHA. Protecting employees was needed. But some of the original regulations would come as a surprise to most people who were not around then. The same can also be said of the original air pollution regulations.
In a fun way, I will explain some of the things that I have learned (and wished I had learned sooner) over the past four and a half decades.

Steve Raper
Chemquest Technology Institute
100 Confroy Dr
South Boston, Va 24592
sraper@chemquest.com

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Raper

Stephen Raper

Director of Product Development, Chemquest
BiographySteve has a BS in Chemistry from Marshall University. He started work at Columbia paint in Febuary 1972. He worked 20 years for small to medium sized paint companies and then went to work for Dry Branch Kaolin which became Imerys. He retired from Imerys in 2014 and did consulting... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 10:30am - 11:00am
Rhythms Room I

10:30am

Fundamentals of Polymer Design for Waterborne Coatings - USM Faculty Tutorials
Abstract:
A waterborne coating is a liquid composition comprising a polymeric binder that is dispersed, or much less frequently, dissolved in water. The average size of the dispersed polymer particles is typically in the 50-500 nm range. The polymers may be formed by polymerization in water, typically using emulsion polymerization; or they may be pre-formed by radical solution polymerization, or bulk or solution step-growth polymerization, and subsequently dispersed in water. Dispersion and/or stabilization of the polymer particles in water is brought about using surfactants. Acrylic latex polymers are the dominant example of polymers created in water using emulsion polymerization. Alkyds, polyurethanes, and epoxies are examples of polymers that are dispersed in water after polymerization. The basic principles of emulsion polymerization will be discussed, as well as the techniques used to disperse pre-formed polymers in water.

Short Course Instructors
avatar for Robson Storey

Robson Storey

Professor, School of Polymer Science and Engineering, The University of Southern Mississippi, University of Southern Missisisippi
Short CourseWelcome & Course OverviewFundamentals of Polymer Design for Waterborne CoatingsThis introductory lecture discusses the general features of polymers used in waterborne coatings, and how these polymers differ from polymers used in traditional solventborne coatings. Various... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 10:30am - 11:00am
Rhythms II-III

11:00am

The Effect of Microfibrillated Cellulose on Mechanical Properties and Performance of Acrylic Elastomeric Roof Coatings - Borregaard
Of late, there has been increased interest in waterborne acrylic elastomeric roof coatings. because they reduce the heat absorption of buildings compared to traditional asphalt roofs.  In addition to heat prevention and energy savings, acrylic roof coating protects the underlying material from water, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, chemicals, and wear.
Waterborne acrylic roof coatings are traditionally thickened with cellulosics such as hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) and associative thickeners such as hydrophobically modified ethoxylated urethanes (HEUR) and hydrophobically modified alkali swellable emulsions (HASE).  The use of these thickeners often leads to challenges with both water resistance and water absorption of the coating.  Additionally, the control of syneresis and sagging is often challenging.
Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), a biobased and multifunctional product made of cellulose is a new alternative to traditional thickeners. MFC consists of fibrils with lateral dimensions in the nanoscale and lengths up to micron scale.  These strong and rather stiff fibrils form strong films (tensile strength up to 210 MPa).  Once MFC is added to a paint, it is usual to see a noticeable effect on the mechanical properties of the final coating.  In addition to the effect on mechanical properties, its unique rheological properties allow for increased stability as well as an easy to apply paint.  The high yield stress of MFC prevents settling of heavy particles as well as floating of hollow microspheres, whereas the strong shear thinning allows the spraying of thick formulations.  This exceptionally thixotropic behavior leads to excellent sag resistance combined with good leveling.
The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of MFC on the key properties of acrylic elastomeric roof coatings, such as tensile strength, water resistance, mudcracking, and adhesion to metal and concrete surfaces. Commonly used thickeners (HEC and HEUR) were used as references.  Different fibrillation degrees and dosage levels of MFC were used to clarify the impact of MFC on tensile strength and elongation as well as the relationship between these two parameters.
We will demonstrate how MFC increases the tensile strength of elastomeric acrylic roof coating without sacrificing the elongation and performance of the coating.

Speakers
avatar for Otto Soidinsalo

Otto Soidinsalo

Technical Application Manager, Borregaard
Otto Soidinsalo, Technical Application Manager, BorregaardDr. Otto Soidinsalo holds a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Helsinki. Currently he works as a Technical Application Manager at Borregaard. Before joining Borregaard, Otto has been working in various positions... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 11:00am - 11:30am
Rhythms Room I

11:00am

Carbon Capture Coatings - Reactive Surfaces
Coatings make a significant contribution toward combating the problem of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels and detrimental impacts of climate change. Ocean-bound algae exist primarily as a thin layer that spreads over vast oceans surfaces currently accounting for most (70 - 80%) of the earth’s photosynthetic conversion of CO2 into oxygen (O2).  This thin layer of horizontal algae has been mimicked in land-based platforms, while minimizing the footprint of land needed by converting the system into coated vertical arrays.  Natural polymer gels have long been used to support the growth of living cells.  Translucent coatings have been designed and prototyped that retain high levels of moisture (> 80% water content) when applied over large vertical surfaces and produce usable products within the coating that can be recovered for added market value. To achieve this, an alga engineered to express genes from a bacterial cellulose producer was used.  As these algae are photosynthetic, this strain produces cellulose from captured CO2 and sunlight. We demonstrate that these genetically-modified algal cells are not only viable in the coating system for months, but they also actively capture CO2 and produce cellulose.  Furthermore, the current coating can be removed from the vertical substrate and easily disassociated, releasing the cellulose for collection.  Other algae have the potential to be genetically modified in a similar manner, whether to produce usable products such as cellulose and other polysaccharides (or protein/fatty acids) or to tailor the host alga for the application conditions, such as arid and/or high light conditions.  This research opens a new field by merging genetically engineered microbes with coatings to produce usable and harvestable products while also sequestering CO2 in the process.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Kemp

Lisa Kemp

Chief Scientific Officer, Reactive Surfaces, Ltd.
BiographyLisa joined Reactive Surfaces in 2016 as the Chief Scientific Officer and manages the research laboratories located within the University of Southern Mississippi’s Technology Accelerator. Lisa received her PhD in Polymer Science and Engineering with a Technology Commercialization... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 11:00am - 11:30am
Rhythms II-III

11:30am

Applications of Evolutionary Operation (EVOP) for the Coatings Industry - Huber
The use of Design of Experiment (DOE) methodologies in the industrial setting has gained a lot of interest in recent years and is being used more frequently.  There are several types of designs that can be used to decrease variation, improve quality and reduce costs, e.g., Taguchi Robust Product Design, Response Surface Methods, etc.  Typically, DOE is limited in industrial manufacturing to designs with less than 16 runs.  The results from these studies do not always account for long-term variation that occurs at the full-scale production level given the differences in process variation, raw materials, etc. over time.  One technique that attempts to account for long-term variation using the results of designed experimentation results is Evolutionary Operation (EVOP).  EVOP was first proposed by Box (1957).  The application of this technique in the wood products industries will be discussed with benefits and shortcomings highlighted.

Speakers
avatar for Terry Liles

Terry Liles

Director of Raw Materials, Huber Engineered Wood
Terry is currently the Director of Adhesives Technology at Huber Engineered Woods at the Innovation Center in Commerce, GA. He is also an adjunct professor at the University of Tennessee. Prior to that he served as Technology Manager and Group Leader at Georgia-Pacific Chemicals and... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 11:30am - 12:00pm
Rhythms Room I

11:30am

The Role of ABA Surfactant Types in Waterborne Formulations
A major challenge within the coating industry is to formulate more environmentally acceptable end products that comply with increasingly restrictive governmental regulations on volatile organic compounds.  Application, performance, and formulating challenges include wetting over low energy surfaces, foam, water sensitivity, rheology, and flow and leveling.
This presentation will review the chemistry, theory, and application of various surfactant types with an emphasis on ABA structured surfactants for waterborne applications. Topics covered will compare the structures and behavior of both nonionic and ionic surfactants.

Speakers
avatar for Sam Morell

Sam Morell

President, samMorell.com
Short CourseRheology of Waterborne CoatingsThis presentation on rheology reviews the basic principles of rheology including its definition and its influencers - chemical structure, morphology, and environmental conditions. The impact by various deformation forces including compression... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 11:30am - 12:00pm
Rhythms II-III

12:00pm

Lunch Break and Student Poster Session
Please visit our student poster session!

Thursday February 20, 2020 12:00pm - 1:30pm

1:00pm

1:30pm

Polysilazanes – Ultimate Solutions for Surface Protection - EMD Performance Materials
Abstract:
Polysilazanes are pre-ceramic polymers with a silicon-nitrogen backbone. In recent years they have developed as a high-performance binder in protective coatings for transportation vehicles, commercial and residential buildings, and industrial plants. Generally speaking, there are two classes of polysilazanes (Figure 1). One is inorganic perhydro-polysilazanes (PHPS) that feature H groups on both Si and N atoms, and the other one is organic polysilazanes (OPSZ) that have organic functional groups grafted onto Si atoms. They have emerged as a leading technology for durable surface protection.
Compared to siloxanes and fluoropolymers, polysilazanes offer outstanding heat stability, surface hardness, and hydrophobicity as well as comparable performance for corrosion and weather protection. This work reviews their structure-property relationship and highlights their advanced performance in high-temperature, surface hardness, weathering and corrosion protection, and anti-graffiti applications.



Speakers
avatar for Yang Wang

Yang Wang

Lab Manager – Functional Solutions, EMD Performance Materials
About:My name is Yang Wang, and I am a R&D Manager for Industrial Solutions at EMD Performance Materials (a business of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany). I manage a technical group that supports R&D, customer projects, and technical sales for our Industrial product portfolio, including... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Rhythms Room I

1:30pm

Self-healing coatings: A deep dive into how to scratch the surface - USM Faculty Tutorials
Abstract

In the present tutorial, we will look at some of the strategies that have been implemented to create materials that can heal. We will cover dynamic covalent bonds and supramolecular and other non-covalent strategies utilized in the context of healing. We will also evaluate the concepts autonomous vs. assisted mending and how they could become relevant for real-life applications.

Speakers
avatar for Tutorial 3 - Yoan Simon

Tutorial 3 - Yoan Simon

Southern Society for Coatings Technology Assistant Professor of Polymer Science, University of Southern Mississippi
BiographyYoan holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree from the Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier. His first contact with research was in the labs of Prof. Bernard Boutevin where he learned about controlled radical polymerization. He started a Ph.D. in Polymer... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Rhythms II-III

2:00pm

“Cradle-to-Grave Approach to Sustainable Coatings” - USM Faculty Tutorial
Abstract
This tutorial will discuss current and emerging strategies aimed at developing new, practical chemistries, polymers, processes, and technologies with potential to improve the sustainability, and where applicable, the degradability of coatings and coatings precursors.

Speakers
avatar for Tutorial 4 - Derek Patton

Tutorial 4 - Derek Patton

University of Southern Mississippi
The Patton Group lab facilities are located in the Shelby Thames Polymer Science Research Center on the Hattiesburg Campus of the University of Southern Mississippi.  Currently, we have three laboratories with eleven fume hoods.  Our labs are well-equipped for organic and polymer... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Rhythms Room I

2:00pm

New Development for Zeta Potential Measurement of Coatings for Stability Characterization - DataPhysics
A new device for measuring zeta potential of coatings was recently developed by DataPhysics Instruments in collaboration with Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden (IPF).  Zeta potential is a measure of the electrical potential at the interface between a solid surface and a liquid, and is an important indicator of the stability of colloidal dispersions.  In a dispersion, the magnitude of the zeta potential provides an indication of the degree of electrostatic repulsion between adjacent, similarly charged particles.  When the particles or molecules are small enough, a high zeta potential will indicate a greater stability and the dispersion will resist aggregation.  A lower zeta potential means that attractive forces between particles may be stronger than repulsive forces, causing the dispersion to break apart and flocculate.  Thus, colloids with a higher zeta potential (negative or positive) are electrically stabilized while colloids with lower zeta potential tend to coagulate or flocculate.
For some years now, IPF has been recognized as a leader in the study of zeta potential measurements related to colloidal systems, the characterization of electrical properties of surfaces, and in the monitoring of chemical reactions. IPF has generated significant ideas for improvement of these test methods and for major enhancements in commercial zeta potential instruments. The unique, new device described in this paper uses the streaming potential principle for electro-kinetic measurements and for the first time, uses innovative bidirectional pressure cycles created with an oscillatory pump. This novel approach yields higher stability of the zeta potential measurements by employing twenty (20) pressure cycles per measurement compared to the traditional four (4) cycles. The new device also includes both temperature control and allows for purging of the sample chamber with inert gas. The teamwork of IPF scientists and expert engineers from DataPhysics Instruments has resulted in a zeta potential device with greatly improved capabilities for broad range of applications including characterization of the stability of coatings.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Simutis

Paul Simutis

Technical Service & Applications Manager, DataPhysics Instruments USA
Paul Simutis has received master’s degree in chemistry from Vilnius University in Lithuania. After graduation Paul worked in chemistry related industry. He has worked with instruments for studying surfaces and interfaces over 10 years and helped many scientists in different companies... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Rhythms II-III

2:30pm

Coffee Break
Thursday February 20, 2020 2:30pm - 3:30pm

2:30pm

Student Poster Session
Please join us for our 2020 Student Poster Session! Student Resume books will be available and privet interviews available upon request - Please contact the Waterborne staff to set up an interview.


Please see the student pages for individual abstracts.

Thursday February 20, 2020 2:30pm - 4:00pm

3:30pm

Novel Energy Cured Mercapto Functional Silicone Q Resin Materials for 3D Printing - Siltech
Mercapto functional silicone-based Q resins and other SH silicone resins are shown to be crosslinkable with vinyl silicones using UV light and photoinitiators.  These materials were evaluated for physical properties and in a series of formulations targeting soft but printable resins for 3D print applications.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Ruckle

Bob Ruckle

Global Marketing and Sales Manager, Siltech Corporation
Bob Ruckle attained his Ph.D. at University of Delaware, and went on to do two post-doctoral fellowships first at Indiana University and then Pennsylvania State University.  He joined Union Carbide’s Silicone business in 1989 as a Research Chemist.   Over the next 20 years Bob... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Rhythms Room I

3:30pm

Redox Optimization for Emulsion Polymer Chase: New Approach to Reduce VOC’s, Cycle Time, and Cost - Bruggemann
Co-author: Lindsay Holsen
Abstract:

Reduction of residual free monomer is required in the manufacture of latexes to reduce VOCs.  This has become even more critical as consumers are demanding coatings with reduced odor. Conventional post-polymerization chase techniques using reducing agent/oxidizer redox pairs can achieve low levels of residual monomers, but this can increase production time, add cost and reduce production capacity.  A post-polymerization redox optimization study was conducted on a production latex made with a thermal persulfate to initiate the main polymerization.  The monomers used were methyl methacrylate, styrene, methacrylic acid, and butyl acrylate.  Various redox combinations were tested in the post-polymerization stage at different dosage levels and feed rate to minimize redox quantity, residual monomers, and time.  It was found that the right redox pair, fed simultaneously at high concentration, was capable of eliminating free monomer down to non-detectable levels in 15 minutes.  This can enable up to 75% cycle time reduction for post-polymerization.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Fithian

Paul Fithian

Regional Sales Manager, BruggemannChemical U.S., Inc.
Paul Fithian is a Regional Sales Manager BruggemannChemical U. S., Inc., focused on helping customers reduce cost, cycle time, and VOC’s with advanced redox techniques for waterborne emulsion polymers. Paul attended Purdue University, obtaining a BS Degree in Chemical Engineeri... Read More →


Thursday February 20, 2020 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Rhythms II-III

4:00pm

Impact of Silanes on the Solution Stability of Latex and Ultimate Paint Film Properties - DyStar
Silanes have been shown to improve film properties of resin systems when they are reacted into the resin or incorporated into a resin solution as additives.  The improved properties result from their unique functionality that allows for inter-polymer crosslinking and chemical bonding to many substrates. Due to the high reactivity of silanes, especially towards hydrolysis and self-condensation, their use as additives in water-based systems can be limited.  Therefore, it would be desirable to successfully disperse the silane additive into water-based resin systems and have that system remaining stable.  Work was done to investigate the structure, functionality and processing conditions to successfully disperse silanes in latex resin.  Application work done to test the impact of these silane additives in clear resins and paint formulations has shown advantages of the dispersed silanes versus standard latex in fully formulated systems.  The authors reason that the property enhancements afforded by this new technology should be applicable to direct-to-metal, architectural and industrial maintenance coatings.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Sims

Michael Sims

R&D Manager, Performance Chemicals, DyStar
BiographyMichael Sims received his Master’s Degree in Synthetic Organic Chemistry from Montana State University, where he focused on G-0 Dendrimers that exhibited two-photon absorption characteristics, to be applied as a thin film coating. These dendrimers were directed towards... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Rhythms Room I

4:00pm

NMP Free PUDs for Greener Technologies - Allnex
This paper will focus on developing next generation, environmentally friendly resins used in formulating low VOC coatings and adhesives.  We will discuss various types of polyurethane dispersions (PUDs) and how they can be used effectively as substitutes for their solvent-based predecessors without sacrificing performance, while providing a more environmentally friendly product.  The discussion will review various techniques in which the formulator can continue to design high-performance primers for plastics, ink receptive and heat sealable coatings, and laminating systems for flexible substrates using PUD technologies.

Speakers
avatar for Irina Kobylanska

Irina Kobylanska

Global Urethanes Technical Manager, Allnex
Irina Kobylanska graduated from Kiev State University with an MS in Polymer Chemistry. She began her career working on mechanisms and catalysts of urethane reactions for the Institute of High Molecular Compounds in Kiev, Ukraine.  She has been working in urethane chemistry for over... Read More →


Thursday February 20, 2020 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Rhythms II-III

4:00pm

4:30pm

Room Temperature Cured Corrosion Protection of Metals with Novel 2K Waterborne Organofunctional Silane Pretreatments - Evonik
As global environmental regulations continue to tighten restrictions on the use of well-established metal surface pretreatment processes such as chromate treatment and phosphatization, the need for environmentally-friendly corrosion protection systems has never been greater.  While one promising alternative to this worldwide regulatory issue is waterborne, heavy metal-free silane pretreatments, this technology often requires significantly high curing temperatures (ranging from 80 – 200 °C) to achieve sufficient corrosion protection of metals.  Although many industries around the world are moving away from hazardous metal surface pretreatment processes due to global regulations and consumer awareness, a majority of these industries do not have the capabilities or cost positions to replace this existing technology with environmentally-friendly alternatives that require elevated temperature curing procedures.  In this work, we demonstrate for the first time that a 2K system comprising of a hydrophobic diamino-functional silane oligomer and a waterborne sol-gel silane provides excellent corrosion resistance, alkaline resistance, and weatherability to metal surfaces (primarily aluminium alloys and steels) when cured at room temperature.  By incorporating this hydrophobic diamino-functional silane oligomer into the waterborne sol-gel silane, the hydrophobicity, surface passivation, and crosslinking density of the system is vastly enhanced - even in the absence of an elevated temperature cure.  These new findings demonstrate significant progress in overcoming the most prevalent obstacle in the use of waterborne silane technology as an environmentally-friendly alternative for corrosion protection of metal surfaces.  Industries and markets that previously could not use environmentally-friendly metal pretreatment technology due to the elevated temperature curing requirements can now explore this field with a higher probability of successfully replacing existing hazardous metal pretreatment technology.

Speakers
avatar for Jacob Shevrin

Jacob Shevrin

Applied Technology Scientist, Evonik Corporation
BiographyJacob Shevrin joined Evonik’s Functional Silanes business line as an Applied Technology Scientist in May of 2017. Since then, his research has focused on silanes for coatings and environmentally-friendly metal treatment applications. Prior to joining Evonik, Jacob obtained... Read More →



Thursday February 20, 2020 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Rhythms Room I

4:30pm

Understanding Surfactant Leaching in Architectural Coatings - Dow
Abstract
In architectural coatings, surfactant leaching is a global issue in which customers have historically sought improvements. Surfactant leaching is the efflux of water soluble species from the paint film resulting in an unwanted change of visual appearance of the coating. There are many factors that can contribute to surfactant leaching both intrinsic to the binder and unique to the formulation as well as environmental factors and various combinations within these broader categories. This talk is focused on discussing appearance of surfactant leaching from analytical point of view, the factors influencing surfactant leaching, mechanisms and possible solutions to improve surfactant leaching.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Gong

Ashley Gong

Associate Research Scientist, Dow
BiographyAshley GONG earned a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from University of California, Santa Barbara. In 2011, Ashley started her career at Dow as a senior scientist in Architectural Coatings Business, where she worked on developing premium binders and rheology modifiers, as well... Read More →


Thursday February 20, 2020 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Rhythms II-III

5:15pm

New Orleans Pub Crawl
*Adding to your schedule on scheduler DOES NOT register you for the event. To register for the event please add to your registration online or visit us at our registration desk. Space is limited so no late registrations are guaranteed.

OPEN TO ALL ATTENDEES AND GUESTS Ages 21+
More details coming shortly
Please Note: We will be leaving the hotel lobby at 5:30 pm sharp. Please meet no later than 5:15 by the bellman desk in the hotel lobby. No refunds available for this item.


Thursday February 20, 2020 5:15pm - 8:00pm
 
Friday, February 21
 

8:00am

High Gloss Direct-To-Metal Waterborne Coatings - AGC Chemical
We evaluate corrosion inhibitors with blends of various waterborne acrylic and FEVE (fluoroethylene vinyl ether) resins for improved adhesion and appearance after UV exposure and corrosion testing when applied as DTM (direct-to-metal - without primer) coatings.  Accelerated outdoor UV exposure, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic salt fog/UV exposure were used to evaluate corrosion resistance along with gloss and color retention.

Speakers
avatar for Donald C. Lawson III

Donald C. Lawson III

Technical Development Chemist, AGC Chemicals Americas, Inc.
BiographyDonald Lawson received his B.S. in chemistry from Illinois State University. With over 39 years of formulation experience in the coatings industry, Mr. Lawson has developed commercial coatings for aerospace, military, and industrial applications. He has written extensive... Read More →



Friday February 21, 2020 8:00am - 8:30am
Rhythms II-III

8:30am

Blending Hydrogel Particles into Various Anti-Corrosive Coatings for Water Mitigation and Performance Property Retention During Environmental Exposure - USM
Coatings protect metal substrates through a variety of processes depending on material type(s), exposure time, and environmental severity, specifically water, oxygen, and electrolytes.  Most coating systems resort to designing torturous pathways within coatings or developing different levels of hydrophobicity to detour water; however, regardless of the polymer, they are not completely impermeable to these corrosion-supporting elements.  Therefore, understanding the mechanism of water equilibrium and saturation location in relation to the polymeric material choices requires innovative research tools and new understandings of how polymer variables affect the subtleties of water management.  Literature speculates that localized hydrophilic addition in polymer-based water management films provides a means to force disruptions in traditional water management by directing the spatial location contribution.  The hydrogel particles facilitate distinct domains with concentrated ionic content, hydration particle diameter, and provide specific locations for the collection of water which perturbs the performance properties.
Hydrogel particles were incorporated into three resin systems, specifically a phenoxy, polyurethane, and commercial epoxy-amine, to understand how hydrophilicity changes the performance properties. The hydrogels were blended at 1 wt% on solids for all coatings and characterized by measuring diffusion patterns, resulting changes in modulus and internal stress, and corrosion analysis. Despite the chemistry of the coatings, networks with hydrogel particles had a 10% by weight higher bulk saturations than their control counterparts. However, this increase in saturation was not detected at the substrate-coating interface with ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, where for example, the phenoxy system exhibited 48% less water at the interface when exposed to deionized water in the presence of hydrogel particles. Mechanical adhesion was also increased by blending hydrogel particles into the resins and is suspected to retain adhesion when exposed to environmental conditions. Continued investigation of property retention included internal stress, cyclic adhesion and void formation, and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Davison

Jessica Davison

Graduate Student, University of Southern Mississippi
BiographyJessica Davison is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Southern Mississippi, in the School of Polymers and High Performance Materials. Her research focuses on the mitigation of corrosion and water management utilizing nanocomposites that are comprised of hydrogel nanoparticles... Read More →



Friday February 21, 2020 8:30am - 9:00am
Rhythms II-III

9:00am

Slippery, Smooth or Sticky? Using Tribo-Rheometry to Characterize Sensory Perception of Coated Surfaces - TA Instruments
Tribology capabilities on commercial rheometers have enabled measurements at lower load forces, friction forces and sliding speeds than industrial tribometers.  These “soft tribology” measurements have proven useful in predicting sensory properties such as mouthfeel or texture.  As tribology is a measurement of surface interactions, the results are highly dependent on test fixture material.  To detect differences perceived by human touch, it is beneficial to select materials that mimic the surface properties of our skin.  Sensory perception is also a consideration for high-contact solid surfaces like personal electronics, or coatings for surfaces in the home, such as matte or gloss paints. Tribology can evaluate the “feel” of these solid surfaces, with appropriate fixtures.  The measurements presented compare steel fixtures with surfaces modified to better mimic skin properties.  An optimum surface material will provide differentiation between samples and minimize variability between measurements.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Cotts

Sarah Cotts

Applications Scientist, TA Instruments
BiographyBachelor's of Science degree from William and Mary in Polymer Chemistry. Prior to joining TA Instruments, she worked as an Applications Chemist for Sartomer developing UV-curable formulations for inks, adhesives, anti-corrosion and wood coatings. She now provides applications... Read More →



Friday February 21, 2020 9:00am - 9:30am
Rhythms II-III

9:30am

Morning Coffee Break
Friday February 21, 2020 9:30am - 10:00am

10:00am

Digitally Disrupted Or Digitally Driven? How Digital can Drive Innovation, Revenue and Profit for Coatings Companies - Alchemy
Abstract 
The specialty chemicals industry is a great example of a legacy market that is ripe for a digital awakening. While we are still at the dawn of digital in coatings, organizations that are driving business decisions based on data are already seeing signs of success and leadership.
In this session we will provide a framework that will help you:
  • Assess where you are on the digital adoption curve
  • Get checklists for gap analysis, project prioritization and vendor selection
  • Connect digital initiatives to operating benefits.
We will then apply the framework to two use cases: 1) cost efficient formulation and 2) enabling growth through M&A.

Speakers
avatar for Sasha Novakovich

Sasha Novakovich

President & CEO, Alchemy
BiographySasha Novakovich is the CEO of Alchemy, an enterprise Software-as-a-Service company modernizing the $1T specialty chemicals industry. Sasha is a veteran tech industry founder and investor. She started her first tech company in 1999, made her first investment in 2007, and... Read More →



Friday February 21, 2020 10:00am - 10:30am
Rhythms II-III

10:30am

Quantifying Corrosion at the Interface of Coated Steel and Identifying the Major Properties from Polymer Coatings that Mitigate the Corrosion Process in the Presence of a Defect During Immersion in Saline Solution - The University of Southern Mississippi
Coatings mitigate corrosion on assets in marine environments by acting as barriers to aggressive molecules while maintaining adhesion to the asset.  Eventually, the coatings are breached or defects develop in the coatings that have the potential to act as breaches.  The performance of breached coatings no longer depends on barrier properties; instead, it depends on the adhesion strength at the polymer-substrate interface and resistance to substrate dissolution (corrosion).  Identifying polymer properties that govern the mitigation of corrosion at this polymer-substrate interface is essential to develop future corrosion control coatings.  Analysis of cathodic disbondment at the polymer-substrate using the unaided eye, scanning acoustic microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and electrochemical analysis techniques has been reported.
Currently, literature is void regarding means to detect the earliest onset of coating failure using a non-destructive method and identify the major polymer properties that govern the mitigation of the corrosion process at the polymer-substrate interface. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM) were employed to obtain time-lapse quantifiable acquisitions of thermoset and thermoplastic polymer clearcoat systems in the presence of an intentionally placed macroscopic breach while immersed in saline solution. CLSM enabled us to quantify the variability of delay time for micro-blister initiation, velocity of micro-blister growth from a defect, and initiation of substrate dissolution at the polymer-substrate interface. Via EFM analysis, we were able to measure the current induced by the corrosion process (e.g., micro-blistering and substrate dissolution) at the polymer-substrate interface. CLSM-EFM time-lapse acquisitions were conducted simultaneously to identify the onset of micro-blistering and substrate dissolution at the polymer-substrate interface to deconvolute the EFM signal from the corrosion process. The EFM corrosion analysis was vetted as an industrially accessible technique to evaluate a coating’s corrosion mitigation performance in the presence of a breach at the polymer-substrate interface for both clear and pigmented coatings during immersion.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher James Scanlon

Christopher James Scanlon

Graduate Student, University of Southern Mississippi
Scanlon’s current research in the Thames-Rawlins Research Group is in developing less destructive analytical methods to quantify the earliest onset of coating failure and substrate dissolution (corrosion) at the polymer-substrate interface from a breach under immersion in saline... Read More →



Friday February 21, 2020 10:30am - 11:00am
Rhythms II-III

11:00am

Promoting the Film Formation and Flexibility of an Asphalt Emulsion Sealer with the Addition of Fibrillated HDPE - MiniFiber
As a follow-up study to a previously reported increase in film flexibility, the film formation at temperatures from 45 to 115°F of films of an asphalt emulsion based driveway sealer with and without the post-addition of fibrillated high-density polyethylene fiber has been investigated. Utilizing six different grades of synthetic fiber, the nominal diameter and the nominal length of the fiber varied from 5 to 15 microns and from 100 to 900 microns, respectively. The resulting propensity of film formation has been shown to generally increase with fiber size; small fiber promoting less film formation than medium or large fiber. In addition, the resulting film formation has been shown to generally increase with fiber application rate; an increasing film forming trend from 0.5% to 1% to 2% fiber. Furthermore, a strong correlation between film formation and the ultimate elongation of the film has been observed.

Speakers
avatar for Bruce Prezzavento

Bruce Prezzavento

Technical Director, MiniFIBERS, Inc.
BiographyDr. Prezzavento comes to MiniFIBERS with widespread experience ranging from science and engineering – to information systems and small business management – to education.As a physical organic chemist with experience in chemical engineering, mechanical and electronics... Read More →



Friday February 21, 2020 11:00am - 11:30am
Rhythms II-III

11:30am